Friday, May 18, 2018

A fanastic crochet pattern

This is a crochet pattern based on the video tutorial shown. 

I want your feedback.  Please tell me if this is coherent and understandable. 




Arbor Shawl




This is based on Fiber Spider's YouTube video found here:   https://youtu.be/OngyvO2Wrk8\


This shawl is composed of leaves with ch3 spaces between.  Each leaf is made of increasing and decreasing rows of dc, with a maximum of 7 dc. 

There is a center spine, which I call the ctr dc.

I have modulized the repeating steps.

leaf beg:  3dc in dc
leaf inc:  2 dc in first and last dc of group, dc in other dcs
leaf dec:  skip first and last dc of group, dc in other dcs


dc inc:  dc, ch1, dc in same stitch
ctr dc inc:  dc, ch1, dc, ch1, dc in ctr dc






ch5, sl st to join
1.     ch 6, dc, ch3, dc, ch3, dc, ch3, dc
2.     ch 6, leaf begin in 1st dc, ch 3, dc in ctr dc, ch 3, leaf begin in next dc, ch 3, dc in 3rd ch of ch6 sp
3.     ch 6, leaf inc, ch 3, dc in ctr dc, ch 3, leaf inc, ch 3, dc in 3rd ch of ch6 sp
4.     ch 4, dc in same sp, ch 3, leaf inc, ch 3, ctr dc inc, ch 3, leaf inc, ch 3, dc inc in 3rd ch of ch6 sp
5.     ch 6, leaf begin in next dc, ch 3, leaf dec, ch 3, leaf beg in next dc, ch 3, dc in ctr dc, ch3, leaf beg in next dc, ch 3, leaf dec, ch 3, leaf beg in next dc, ch 3, dc in 3rd ch of ch4 sp
6.     ch 6, leaf inc, ch 3, leaf dec, ch 3, leaf inc, ch 3, dc in ctr dc, ch3, leaf inc, ch 3, leaf dec, ch 3, leaf inc, ch 3, dc in 3rd ch of ch6 sp






Repeat the following three rows until shawl is the size you want, ending on a row B. If your counts don’t match these counts, you’ve made a mistake somewhere.
A.   ch 4, dc in same sp, ch 3 between leaves and between leaf and ctr dc, leaf inc growing leaves (7 dc), leaf dec shrinking leaves (1 dc), ctr dc inc in ctr dc, ch 3 between leaves, leaf inc growing leaves (7 dc), leaf dec shrinking leaves (1 dc), dc inc in 3rd ch of ch6 sp
B.    ch 6, ch 3 between leaves and between leaf and ctr dc, leaf beg in every single dc, leaf inc growing leaves (3 dc), leaf dec shrinking leaves (5 dc), dc in ctr dc, ch 3 between leaves and between leaf and ctr dc, leaf beg in every single dc, leaf inc growing leaves (3 dc), leaf dec shrinking leaves (5 dc), dc in 3rd ch of ch4 sp
C.    ch 6, ch 3 between leaves and between leaf and ctr dc, leaf inc growing leaves (5 dc), leaf dec shrinking leaves (3 dc), dc in ctr dc, ch 3 between leaves and between leaf and ctr dc, leaf inc growing leaves (5 dc), leaf dec shrinking leaves (3 dc), dc in 3rd ch of ch6 sp

edging row
ch 1, 3 sc into ch3 sp
ch 3, 3 sc, ch3 in every ch 3 sp
dc3tog in every group of 3 dc
ch 1, dc3tog starting in 2nd dc, ch1 in every group of 5 dc
ch 3, 3 sc into ch3 sp, sc in ctr dc, 3sc crochet in ch3 sp, ch3 in center cluster
End with last ch3 sp, tie off






Monday, November 27, 2017

More crochet pics!

Scrap scarf
I don't remember what it's called, but it's
made with alternating front-post and
back-post double crochet stitches

Friday, November 24, 2017

A word from Scrooge

As we hurl ourselves into the holiday season (making some of us want to hurl), I must make an effort to educate you lot about one more language thing that makes me crazy. Well, crazier.

Which of the following is a Christmas carol?

A.  Joy to the world
B.  Here we come a-caroling
C.  I saw Mommy kissing Santa Claus
D.  We need a little Christmas
E.  Coventry carol


The correct answer is B. Only B. OK, sometimes E, depending on how it's treated. A is a Christmas hymn. C and D are Christmas songs. (D is also an abomination, but I digress.)

A Christmas carol is a type of Christmas song. It is not every Christmas song. Wikipedia, that authoritative source, defines it thusly: "A carol is in Modern English a festive song, generally religious but not necessarily connected with church worship, and often with a dance-like or popular character." Please note the the important characteristics: festive, dance-like or popular character, not necessarily connected with church worship. 

Picture actual carolers in medieval England, going from house to house offering a few moments of entertainment, hoping to be invited in for a mug of wassail and gifted with a coin or two. The carolers would have been poor tenant farmers or townspeople knocking on doors of wealthy merchants or landholders. Would they be singing "I want a hippopotamus for Christmas"? Not likely. They'd be singing "Good King Wenceslaus" or "Deck the Hall". The spirit of those carols made reference to Christmas while also celebrating the secular fun that is had at Christmas--often poking fun at the householder they're serenading, suggesting the only way to show the Christmas spirit is to invite the carolers in.

Splitting hairs?  Yes. Will it spoil your holiday season if you use the wrong term? I doubt it. Will it spoil mine? Not really. But God keeps track of such things!


Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Photos of last weekend's craft bazaar

I did a Christ Church Riverdale's Holiday Craft Bazaar last weekend.  Here are some pics!

My variety of hats. this photo was taken at home.

I had much more stuff than I needed.

Wearing the sweater I'd made hubby.
I wore various shawls throughout the day.

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Another cooking post: my delicious chili

My chili is based on the chili I watched my mother make all of my childhood, amped up a little bit.  I honestly don't know what Tex-Mex purists might think of it, but I've never had anyone say he didn't like it.  As with my chicken soup, all measurements are guesses approximations, and you should adjust to taste.

Not my chli, but mine looks like this

  • Roughly chop four small onions and add to your stock pot, with a healthy swig of vegetable oil and a good pinch of salt.
  • Add chili powder, adobo chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, dried garlic, coriander, and a slight dash of cinnamon, as well as any other seasonings you fancy.  Amounts are up to you, but I recommend 1 tsp each for starters, except for the cinnamon. If you want more, you can add it later. Toasting them at this stage enhances the flavor.  
  • Cook, stirring frequently, until onions are translucent.
  • Add 2 or more lbs. of ground beef and another pinch of salt, as well as freshly ground black pepper.  Stir frequently to break beef into small pieces. Allow any liquid that cooks out to evaporate and ensure your beef is well browned.  
  • Add two 28 oz. cans of crushed or diced tomoatoes and two 28 oz. cans of red beans or pinto beans.  To get as much of the goop out of the bottom of the cans as possible, I swish leftover coffee back and forth between the cans and pour it in.  Beef stock or water would also work.  Those who add beer to their chili would find this an opportune way to introduce it.
  • Add more liquid to fill the stock pot, stir well, and bring to a boil.  
  • Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally.  And simmer.  And simmer some more.  Then simmer another hour.  Simmering several hours is crucial. The flavor mellows remarkably over that time.
  • 30 minutes or more before serving, add in shredded corn tortillas to thicken.  The tortillas will dissolve completely. Alternatively, use a slurry of corn meal and water or milk. (Milk is especially useful if you find you've added too much heat. You can also add butter to reduce the heat.)
  • Adjust salt and pepper to taste.
  • I serve with the following toppings, which guests can mix or match to their liking:
    • Sour cream
    • Corn chips or tortilla chips
    • Shredded cheese
    • Diced raw onion
    • Sliced jalapeno peppers
    • Cilantro
    • Bottled hot sauces, if desired.